Southern Oregon Driver Education, Inc.

Email: info@SouthernOregonDriverEd.com  

Phone: 541.499.0132

P.O. Box 1673, Jacksonville, OR 97530

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NEWS & AWARDS

MEDFORD May 18, 2016 - Southern Oregon Driver Education, Inc has been selected for the 2016 Best of Medford Award in the Schools & Instruction category by the Medford Award Program.

The Medford Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Medford area.  Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value.

According to the National Safety Commission, cruise control can cause your car to hydroplane. Written by: Andryanna Sheppard, KDRV

MEDFORD, Ore. -- Not only does the rain impact your eye sight while driving, it can also cause you to hydroplane when you come across puddles. Driving instructor Robert Jones said that's just a part of driving in this weather.

"You'll actually feel your tires lose that traction on the roadway,” Jones added.

According to the Federal Highway Administration, rainy weather accounted for more than 550,000 crashes between 2007 and 2016. That's 46 percent of all weather related crashes. Jones said the best way to get out of hydroplaning is to take your feet off the pedals and let your car slow down naturally. Do not step on the breaks.

"The more steering input you place on your vehicle the less chance you have of controlling your vehicle," Jones added. While you might think driving at a consistent speed will keep you safe, driving with cruise control in the rain does the opposite. "Cruise control is a device to be used on the roadway when its dry conditions, lots of space between your vehicle and other vehicles," said Jones.

According to the National Safety Commission, cruise control can cause your car to hydroplane.

 

Cruise control is also disabled when you hit your breaks. “That’s not something you want to do if you’re all of a sudden hitting a patch of water and slamming your foot on the break to regain control of the vehicle." Jones said the best ways to drive safely in the rain is to be aware of your surroundings and make sure there is at least a four second space between you and the car ahead.